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Sunday, August 17, 2014

giFT plugin for Ares P2P network.

giFT-Ares is a plugin for giFT that connects to the Ares peer-to-peer filesharing network. Here you can find last (2010.11.23) working packages for Ubuntu GNU/Linux distributions.

giFT filesharing system is a modular daemon capable of abstracting the communication between the end user and specific filesharing protocols (peer-to-peer or otherwise). The giFT project differs from many other similar projects in that it is a distribution of a standalone platform-independent daemon, a library for client/frontend development, and modules for their own homegrown network, OpenFT, as well as the existing Gnutella network.

Apollon is a graphical frontend (KDE-based) to the giFT file-sharing system. It allows the user to perform searches and control downloads and uploads. Apollon needs a giFT daemon to be useful.

Apollon has many fine features such as file preview, multi-tabbed searching, filtering of search results, docking in the KDE/GNOME system tray, and downloading of entire remote directories.

Here we provide last packages from old Ubuntu versions.

giftoxic

Wednesday, August 13, 2014

Convert Audio / Video Files With Selene Media Encoder.

Selene is an audio/video converter for converting files to OGG/OGV/ MKV/MP4/WEBM/OPUS/AAC/FLAC/MP3/WAV formats.

It aims to provide a simple GUI for converting files to popular formats along with powerful command-line options for automated/unattended encoding.

Features.

  • Encode videos to MKV/MP4/OGV/WEBM formats.
  • Encode music to MP3/AAC/OGG/OPUS/FLAC/WAV formats.
  • Option to pause/resume encoding
  • Option to run in background and shutdown PC after encoding
  • Bash scripts can be written to control the encoding process
  • Commandline interface for unattended/automated encoding

Selene is an audio/video converter for Linux that uses bash scripts for transcoding the input files. The scripts can use any command line utility for encoding the input and Selene will display the progress along with options to pause/resume/shutdown, etc.

Since the conversion process is driven by bash scripts, this makes Selene extremely flexible. Bash scripts can be written for a wide variety of transcoding tasks.

selene media encoder main_2.2

Monday, August 11, 2014

Custom Stellarium Landscapes.

After my first successful try today, I thought I'd write a little tutorial for creating landscapes. Here are some (hopefully) simple steps:

1. Take your images. All I did was take my compact camera and my tripod out to my desired location, and take a set of horizon shots (all the way round) and then import them to Autostitch to make a simple panorama (see below). I filled the ground in by copying and pasting, as you can see (the original panorama was not straight, so it left some black areas underneath).
The Panorama must be a PNG, and I recommend sizing it down to about 2048 pixels in width. The following panorama has already been processed for Stellarium (see step 3) which is why the sky is missing. Once you have your panorama, move on to step 2. 

2. Extend the canvas. This involves increasing the height of the image above and below the horizon, as shown in the illustration below. This is important because otherwise the horizon will be too 'thin' and it means that you have to zoom out too much for the scenery to be properly sized.
stellarium2

Saturday, August 9, 2014

Stellarium Landscapes: South America, Polar regions and Special.

Creating a Personalised Landscape for Stellarium.

Digital cameras are easy and cheaply available these days so whatever you have should do.

One mega-pixel resolution is quite sufficient.

The camera needs to be mounted on a tripod so that reasonably orientated pictures can be taken.

Select a time of day that is quite bright with a neutral cloudy sky so there will be no shadows and a sky of the same overall texture.

This will make it easier to remove later.

The pictures were all saved in the JPG format which was used as the common format for all processes up to the removal of the background.

With a camera that takes 4:3 ratio pictures I found 14 evenly spaced pictures gave the best 360° panorama in the program I used to produce it.

stellarium largeImg

Stellarium Landscapes: North America.

dAfter my first successful try today, I thought I'd write a little tutorial for creating landscapes. Here are some (hopefully) simple steps:

5. Write your landscape file. This can be done by copying and editing the following text into your 'landscape.ini' file:
[landscape]
name = Enter your landscape name here
author = Enter your name here
description = Enter a description here
type = spherical
maptex = yourimagename.png
angle_rotatez = Enter angle
[location]
planet = Enter planet
latitude = +XXdXX'XX"
longitude = -XXdXX'XX"W
altitude = X
name: This is the name of your landscape as it will appear in the program.
author: Your name
description: A brief description of the landscape.
type: The style of image. Leave as spherical.
maptex: The filename of your panorama (in the same folder as the .ini file).
angle_rotatez: Experiment with this to get your compass points in the right location. It is a three figure bearing (i.e. - 010, 254, etc...)
planet: The name of the planet your landscape is on.
latitude/longitude: The location of your landscape on your planet. Does not need to be accurate - it is for reference purposes only. It will not affect what you see in the sky.
altitude: The altitude (M) of your spot. Once again, purely for reference.

stellarium 26_large

Stellarium Landscapes: Europe.

edAfter my first successful try today, I thought I'd write a little tutorial for creating landscapes. Here are some (hopefully) simple steps:

3. Delete the sky from the image. Stellarium looks for 'blank' locations in the image when it decides where the scenery ends and the sky begins, so you need to erase the actual sky from the photo. I used paint.net to select the sky in my panorama, and then pressed 'delete' to get rid of it, exposing the checkered canvas behind. You cannot just paint over it in MS Paint, you actually need to remove it from the canvas. To add extra effect, you can delete the pixels in subtle areas (between tree branches, through windows, etc...) to produce a realistic horizon.


4. Create your landscape folder. You need to add a new folder to the Program Files --- Stellarium --- landscapes directory (its name does not matter). Then, create a next file called 'landscape.ini' (you can copy and paste this from another landscape folder and erase its contents) and copy your panorama to the same folder.

stellarium2

Stellarium Landscapes: Asia and Australasia.

After my first successful try today, I thought I'd write a little tutorial for creating landscapes. Here are some (hopefully) simple steps:


1. Take your images. All I did was take my compact camera and my tripod out to my desired location, and take a set of horizon shots (all the way round) and then import them to Autostitch to make a simple panorama (see below). I filled the ground in by copying and pasting, as you can see (the original panorama was not straight, so it left some black areas underneath). The Panorama must be a PNG, and I recommend sizing it down to about 2048 pixels in width. The following panorama has already been processed for Stellarium (see step 3) which is why the sky is missing. Once you have your panorama, move on to step 2.

2. Extend the canvas. This involves increasing the height of the image above and below the horizon, as shown in the illustration below. This is important because otherwise the horizon will be too 'thin' and it means that you have to zoom out too much for the scenery to be properly sized. You can see it as putting more floor between you and the horizon scenery, meaning that it appears further away from you. The actual horizon on Stellarium runs through the centre of the image, so you need to keep your image horizon in the middle of the picture when you are adding the extensions.

 

stellarium fish

Stellarium Landscapes: Africa.

How to install landscapes After you have downloaded the .zip file for a landscape from this page, you need to install it in Stellarium.

Manual.

If you are using an earlier version of Stellarium, you can follow this procedure to install a landscape package:

  1. Browse to your User Data Directory, which varies according to your operating system. (eg. in Windows Vista/7 enter  %appdata%\stellarium in Explorer's location bar )
  2. Create a sub-directory called landscapes in your user directory (if it doesn't exist).
  3. Unzip the landscape .zip file in the landscapes directory (if it's done right, a sub-directory should be created for each landscape).

NOTE: Older version of Stellarium (prior to v0.9.0) used a slightly different mechanism for doing landscapes. You can find a list of the old landscapes here.

stellarium add-remove-landscapes-window

Stellarium Landscapes: Interplanetary.

How to install landscapes

After you have downloaded the .zip file for a landscape from this page, you need to install it in Stellarium.

Automatic.

If you have Stellarium 0.10.6 or later version, you can use the "Add/remove landscapes" feature to install landscapes automatically:

  • Open the "Sky and viewing options" window by clicking on the appropriate button in the left button bar (or press the F4 key).
  • The "Add/remove landscapes" button is at the bottom of the "Landscape" tab.
  • When you press it, the "Add/remove landscapes" window will appear. It allows you to install .zip files containing landscapes. It also lists the user-installed landscapes and allows you to remove them.

Note: that while this makes installing landscapes easier, it may also cause you to overlook what else is included in the ZIP archive. Landscape packages created without this feature in mind may contain other files, such as alternative textures in different sizes.

stellarium add-remove-landscapes-button

Thursday, August 7, 2014

Top 10 blog posts for July 2014 from Linuxlandit & The Conqueror Penguin.

1.- Roxen WebServer is a full-featured open-source web server distributed under the GPL license.

Roxen WebServer is a full-featured open-source web server distributed under the GPL license.

Roxen WebServer is a full-featured open-source web server distributed under the GPL license. It runs on a number of different operating systems including Windows, Linux, Solaris and Mac OS X. Some of the strong points of this server is:     Open source code.     A web-based interface for easy configuration and administration.     The highly regarded Roxen graphics support which can be

Read More ... »

Thursday, July 31, 2014

Roxen WebServer is a full-featured open-source web server distributed under the GPL license.

Roxen WebServer is a full-featured open-source web server distributed under the GPL license. It runs on a number of different operating systems including Windows, Linux, Solaris and Mac OS X.

Some of the strong points of this server is:

    Open source code.
    A web-based interface for easy configuration and administration.
    The highly regarded Roxen graphics support which can be used for dynamic generation of e.g. headers, images and charts.
    Integrated MySQL database.
    Server-side programming via RXML, Java, Perl, PHP, CGI scripts and more.
    Strong encryption.
    Modular architecture where server extensions can be loaded without shutting down the server process.
    Platform-independent architecture makes custom modules portable with no extra effort.

Roxen WebServer is a collection of scripts and modules. The start script sets up some essential environment variables to keep dynamic libraries and various other external stuff happy. After a rapid progression of start script argument parsing and setting up paths, it rotates the logs and launches the first Pike script: server/base_server/roxenloader.pike.

roxenwebserver

Next in turn, the Roxen loader bootstraps the server, making sure some dependencies are met, setting up some constants, and installs Roxen WebServer's own master program, server/etc/roxen_master.pike. This program is responsible for, among other things, the dumping and reloading of programs.

Then, the very core of Roxen WebServer, server/base_server/roxen.pike gets loaded. The configuration of all virtual servers are loaded next, their respective ports get registered and unless the flag --no-delayed-load was passed to the start script, not much more happens next until the first request arrives to a server. This means, of course, this code in a module of yours will not run until a server using the module is needed.

At this stage, the server process is up and will listen to incoming requests on all registered ports. When a request to an uninitialized server is received, Roxen will initialize that server, loading and strapping all of its modules. The request is then sent through the common processing sequence. Your applications will not be affected by the delayed loading. To the application, whether it be a module, a script, an rxml page or a servlet, the delayed loading is transparent and does not interfere with the programming environment.

For the rest of the lifespan of the Roxen process, it will go about its business listening and responding to requests, until terminated with a signal to the process, the start script or by the restart/shutdown administrator action. When the Roxen process receives a SIGHUP signal, it reloads its configuration files. A SIGINT/SIGTERM signal takes down the process and makes the start script spawn off a new one to replace the old one (sending a SIGINT/SIGTERM to the start script shuts down the server without respawning another one).

Calling Sequence.

This is a description of the order of calling modules in Roxen. Generally speaking, an incoming request passes through a number of type levels, which will be described in turn. A failure at a type level means that none of the modules of that type could treat the request. The case where there are no modules of a certain type is a trivial case of failure.

A failure usually means that the request is passed on to the next level. What happens when a module succeeds in treating the request depends on the level and module. The specific Java module interfaces are described in the Reference for Roxen Java Classes chapter in this manual.

roxenwebserver_linux

    Protocol Modules.

    An incoming request enters Roxen through the protocol module, which handles the lower level communication with the client.

    Authentication Modules

    If the protocol module got some form of authentication information from the client, the authentication module is invoked. Regardless of the success or failure, the request moves on to the next layer. The authentication status (fail or a valid user identity) is stored in the request information object.

    First Try Modules

    The first try modules get the first shot at returning a response of some sort to the client. From here on, success or failure means breaking out of or staying with the flow of the calling sequence; handled requests are sent back to the client, unhandled are subject to enter the other module types further down the chain.

    Location Modules

    The request now enters a location module; which one depends on the path accessed. In this respect, the location modules work almost like your average file system; a given path refers to a certain file entry on some storage medium somewhere. Or, possibly, a directory entry or a non-existent file. In either of the latter cases, the request moves on.
    This module has a Java inteface.

    The Directory Listing Module

    The request was found a directory at some earlier level, and it is now up to the directory listing module to generate some form of directory listing or representation of the directory at hand.

    File Extension Modules

    If some previous level sent handled a request by sending forth a file down the chain, it is processed by an appropriate file extension module (if one handling the proper extension was available).

    The Content Type Module

    The content-type module tags the resulting page with a suitable content-type for the file being sent back to the browser. Modules may of course override this, should they know what they want.

    Filter Modules

    All requests then pass through the filter module stage. Filter modules may process and alter the request at leisure, watermarking, filtering out information or doing other forms of post processing.

    Last Modules

    If no module has yet handled the request, the last modules get a shot at catching and processing the request before a file not found error is sent back to the client.
    This module has a Java inteface.

    Protocol Modules

    The protocol module which originally set this chain going is returned the result from previous stages and starts sending the result to the client in response to the request.

    Logger Modules

    Finally, as the result is being transferred back to the client, the logger modules get their peek at the request. When the logger modules are done and the whole response is sent to the browser, the request information object dies and the request is over.

roxen-transmit-webdav

Download.


RedHat Enterprise Linux 5 x86: Roxen WebServer 5.4.66 (178.9 MB)


RedHat Enterprise Linux 5 x86_64: Roxen WebServer 5.4.66 (183.2 MB)


RedHat Enterprise Linux 6 x86_64: Roxen WebServer 5.4.66 (179.3 MB)


Source code: Roxen WebServer 5.4.66 (28.2 MB)

Install.

  1. Download the appropriate file for your operating system.
  2. Run the binary using the "sh" command like this:
    sh roxen-5.4.xxx-....sh
    Please note:
    • The installation script needs to write a few temporary files in the current working directory when invoked (they are removed automatically).
    • The installation script will not write any files outside the paths you specify except for the temporary files in the current working directory.

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Saturday, July 12, 2014

Chitwanix OS 1.5 codename Khukuri has been released.

Chitwanix OS is a Linux distribution developed by a community of Linux developers in Nepal.

Chitwanix OS is an Ubuntu-based distribution that has been crafted to fit the needs of computer users in Nepal.

It comes with the Sagarmatha desktop environment (a fork of Linux Mint's Cinnamon) and it also offers various user-friendly enhancements.

The developers of Chitwanix OS are cooperating with user communities in Nepal in order to translate the operating system and applications into Nepali, as well as Tharu, Newari, Gurung and Magar languages.

New Features and Improvements:-

- Sagarmatha version 1.0.2

- HTML5 Login screen with user list and On-screen keyboard on the login screen..

- Updated Software Packages.

- Will receive software updates and will have binary as well as source code repository access.

- Improvements in drivers and supports like WiFi drivers, Ethernet drivers, Graphics, HDMI, etc.

- Improvements in Nemo and its extensions.

- Artworks Improvements.

chitwanix-small

Tuesday, July 8, 2014

Model Builder is a graphical tool for designing, simulating and analysing Mathematical models).

Model Builder is a graphical tool for designing, simulating and analysing Mathematical models consisting of a system of ordinary differential equations(ODEs).

Features:

  • Equation-based model definition. No need to learn to program to define and run your models. Just type-in you differential equations
  • Graphic output of simulation. You can save the graphics in the most common formats: png, svg, pdf, etc.
  • Spreadsheet view of the results. From the spreadsheet you can make customized plots from your variables. You can also export your data to a .csv text file
  • Latex rendering of your system of equations.
  • Intuitive graphical interface.
  • Free software. Licensed under the GPL
  • Portable. Run wherever Python runs.
  • Uncertainty analysis module (coming soon!)

Getting started.

The best way to get started with ModelBuilder is open one of the models  included  with the distribution and look at it . Yes, it’s that simple.

model builder5

NETGEN is an automatic 3d tetrahedral mesh generator.

Accessible and cross-platform C++-based application that enables you to quickly develop and generate 3D meshes in no time at all

NETGEN is a powerful and automatic 3D tetrahedral mesh generator. The application is designed to accept input from constructive solid geometry (CSG) or boundary representation (BRep) from STL file format.

This program will generate triangular or quadrilateral meshes in 2D, and tetrahedral meshes in 3D.

The input for 2D is described by spline curves, and the input for 3D problems can be defined by Constructive Solid Geometry (CSG), the standard STL file format, or via Boundary Representations (BRep/IGES/STEP) when compiled with OpenCascade support.

NETGEN also provides modules for automated mesh optimization and hierarchical mesh refinement. Curved elements or arbitrary order are supported.

Features.

    Two and three dimensional surface meshing
    Three dimensional volume meshing
    Delaunay and advancing front mesh generation algorithms
    Constructive solid geometry, or boundary representation
    Mesh refinement algorithms
    High order curved elements

netgen13

MrBayes is a program for Bayesian inference and model choice across a wide range of phylogenetic and evolutionary models.

MrBayes is a program for Bayesian inference and model choice across a wide range of phylogenetic and evolutionary models. MrBayes uses Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods to estimate the posterior distribution of model parameters.

Program features include:

    A common command-line interface across Macintosh, Windows, and UNIX operating systems;
    Extensive help available from the command line;
    Analysis of nucleotide, amino acid, restriction site, and morphological data;
    Mixing of data types, such as molecular and morphological characters, in a single analysis;
    Easy linking and unlinking of parameters across data partitions;
    An abundance of evolutionary models, including 4 X 4, doublet, and codon models for nucleotide data and many of the standard rate matrices for amino acid data;
    Estimation of positively selected sites in a fully hierarchical Bayesian framework;
    Full integration of the BEST algorithms for the multi-species coalescent.
    Support for complex combinations of positive, negative, and backbone constraints on topologies;
    Model jumping across the GTR model space and across fixed rate matrices for amino acid data;
    Monitoring of convergence during the analysis, and access to a wide range of convergence diagnostics tools after the analysis has finished;
    Rich summaries of posterior samples of branch and node parameters printed to majority rule consensus trees in FigTree format;
    Implementation of the stepping-stone method for accurate estimation of model likelihoods for Bayesian model choice using Bayes factors;
    The ability to spread jobs over a cluster of computers using MPI (for Macintosh (OS X) and UNIX environments only);
    Support for the BEAGLE library, resulting in dramatic speedups for codon and amino acid models on compatible hardware (NVIDIA graphics cards);
    Checkpointing across all models, allowing the user to seemlessly extend a previous analysis or recover from a system crash;

mrbayes

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