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Sunday, September 14, 2014

Mindomo is an online mind mapping tool for visual learning, improving creativity and problem solving.

Mindomo is an online mind mapping tool for visual learning, improving creativity and problem solving. With Mindomo, you can organise and get an overview of thoughts, ideas, links, and other information visually.

In order for the brain to remember what you learn, knowledge needs to be categorized. 

To make the learning process easier and more fun, you can use the mind map tool to make a map of your thoughts and sort them thematically.

The mind map is well suited for exploring new material, looking at connections between new and known knowledge, and organizing material for further development.

In addition to text, you can also add links and media files to your mind maps in Mindomo:

    Add pictures from Flickr, Google, Bing or Wikipedia
    Add film from YouTube, Vimeo, Creaza or your own productions
    Record sound
    Add sound clips from Creaza or your own productions
    Export to PDF and picture formats

mindomo5

Thursday, September 11, 2014

Agnitus is a developer of touch-enabled learning applications.

Agnitus combines 60+ great educational apps for kids and gives you the ability to track your child's progress with a wide variety of reports.

Agnitus games are both entertaining and teaching tools for children based on an actual educational curriculum.

Animated demo video produced by http://grumomedia.com

    Your child loves to play video games.
    BUT as a parent it’s hard to know if the games are appropriate or turning your kid’s brain into mush.
    And if they are playing an educational game what do they do once they’ve figured it out and are super bored?
    Well...you can toss those worries out the window.
    Agnitus games are both entertaining and teaching tools, based on an actual educational curriculum.
    And as soon as your child figures out a game or skill, our super clever system automatically adjusts the level to keep your child engaged and learning by unlocking new games that are next up on the curriculum.
    And the gynormous cherry on top?
    Parents get updates like detailed little report cards.
    Just hold down the Report Card button and a little dashboard appears.
    From there you can see: the entire curriculum map, how much your child is playing, what they’re learning, their strengths and weaknesses and how they’re doing compared to their peers.
    Or you can subscribe to email updates and receive the progress reports that way.
    Get ready to enter the world of Agnitus and watch your little one’s brain grow and grow.
    Agnitus – Games for Learning.

agnitus_grumo_demo_video_01-536x301

New version of SparkyLinux available.

SparkyLinux is a lightweight, fast and simple Linux distribution disigned for both old and new computers featuring customized Enlightenment and LXDE desktops.

It has been built on the “testing” branch of Debian GNU/Linux.

Available for i486 and x86_64 machines.

Main features:
– Debian testing based
– rolling release
– lightweight, fast & simple
– main edition – lightweight & fast LXDE desktop
– Enlightenment – lightweight and beautiful
– ultra light edition with Openbox and JWM desktops (Ultra Edition)
– special gaming edition: GameOver
– MATE Edition with GNOME 2 fork desktop
– Razor-Qt Edition with Qt based desktop
– CLI Edition for building own customized desktop
– most wireless and mobile network cards supported
– set of selected applications, multimedia codecs and plugins
– easy hard drive / USB installation

Download.

sparky-33-lxde

Monday, September 8, 2014

Dr. Panda’s Restaurant cook delicious meals.

Come to Dr. Panda’s Restaurant and cook delicious food for the animal guests! Dr. Panda’s cookbook has foods from all over the world that kids can make through a series of fun and engaging minigames. Bon appétit!!

SmartAppsForKids – “Awesome and affordable app that preschoolers will love”

TheiMums – “This app is a great one for practicing fine motor skills, routines and sequencing as well as interacting with a variety of animals and taking their orders.”

FunEducationalApps – “TribePlay has proven to develop and create fun and top educational apps for preschoolers and toddlers”

BestAppsForKids – “A perfect example of when everything comes together perfectly – design, fun, interaction, great price, and within a kid-safe environment.”

In this app, kids will be introduced to cooking through fun and exciting mini-games. They will be exposed to a number of foods from different cultures, all from Dr. Panda’s cookbook which contains 10 different dishes and drinks; including pizza, apple pie, corn soup, Chinese stir-fry and fruit smoothies.

dr panda restaurant-logo

PerlPrimer open-source PCR primer design.

PerlPrimer is a free, open-source GUI application written in Perl that designs primers for standard PCR, bisulphite PCR, real-time PCR (QPCR) and sequencing. It aims to automate and simplify the process of primer design.

PerlPrimer's current features include the following:

  • Calculation of possible primer-dimers
  • Retrieval of genomic or cdna sequences from Ensembl (including both sequences automatically for QPCR)
  • Ability to BLAST search primers using the NCBI server or a local server
  • Results can be saved or optionally exported in a tab-delimited format that is compatible with most spreadsheet applications.
  • ORF and CpG island detection algorithms
  • Ability to add cloning sequences to primers, automatically adjusted to be in-frame
  • QPCR primer design without manual intron-exon boundary entry

PerlPrimer calculates primer melting temperature using J. SantaLucia's extensive nearest-neighbour thermodynamic parameters.

perlprimer

Friday, September 5, 2014

Top 10 blog posts for August 2014 from Linuxlandit & The Conqueror Penguin.

1.- giFT plugin for Ares P2P network.

giFT plugin for Ares P2P network.

giFT-Ares is a plugin for giFT that connects to the Ares peer-to-peer filesharing network. Here you can find last (2010.11.23) working packages for Ubuntu GNU/Linux distributions. giFT filesharing system is a modular daemon capable of abstracting the communication between the end user and specific filesharing protocols (peer-to-peer or otherwise). The giFT project differs from many other

Read More ... »

Sunday, August 17, 2014

giFT plugin for Ares P2P network.

giFT-Ares is a plugin for giFT that connects to the Ares peer-to-peer filesharing network. Here you can find last (2010.11.23) working packages for Ubuntu GNU/Linux distributions.

giFT filesharing system is a modular daemon capable of abstracting the communication between the end user and specific filesharing protocols (peer-to-peer or otherwise). The giFT project differs from many other similar projects in that it is a distribution of a standalone platform-independent daemon, a library for client/frontend development, and modules for their own homegrown network, OpenFT, as well as the existing Gnutella network.

Apollon is a graphical frontend (KDE-based) to the giFT file-sharing system. It allows the user to perform searches and control downloads and uploads. Apollon needs a giFT daemon to be useful.

Apollon has many fine features such as file preview, multi-tabbed searching, filtering of search results, docking in the KDE/GNOME system tray, and downloading of entire remote directories.

Here we provide last packages from old Ubuntu versions.

giftoxic

Wednesday, August 13, 2014

Convert Audio / Video Files With Selene Media Encoder.

Selene is an audio/video converter for converting files to OGG/OGV/ MKV/MP4/WEBM/OPUS/AAC/FLAC/MP3/WAV formats.

It aims to provide a simple GUI for converting files to popular formats along with powerful command-line options for automated/unattended encoding.

Features.

  • Encode videos to MKV/MP4/OGV/WEBM formats.
  • Encode music to MP3/AAC/OGG/OPUS/FLAC/WAV formats.
  • Option to pause/resume encoding
  • Option to run in background and shutdown PC after encoding
  • Bash scripts can be written to control the encoding process
  • Commandline interface for unattended/automated encoding

Selene is an audio/video converter for Linux that uses bash scripts for transcoding the input files. The scripts can use any command line utility for encoding the input and Selene will display the progress along with options to pause/resume/shutdown, etc.

Since the conversion process is driven by bash scripts, this makes Selene extremely flexible. Bash scripts can be written for a wide variety of transcoding tasks.

selene media encoder main_2.2

Monday, August 11, 2014

Custom Stellarium Landscapes.

After my first successful try today, I thought I'd write a little tutorial for creating landscapes. Here are some (hopefully) simple steps:

1. Take your images. All I did was take my compact camera and my tripod out to my desired location, and take a set of horizon shots (all the way round) and then import them to Autostitch to make a simple panorama (see below). I filled the ground in by copying and pasting, as you can see (the original panorama was not straight, so it left some black areas underneath).
The Panorama must be a PNG, and I recommend sizing it down to about 2048 pixels in width. The following panorama has already been processed for Stellarium (see step 3) which is why the sky is missing. Once you have your panorama, move on to step 2. 

2. Extend the canvas. This involves increasing the height of the image above and below the horizon, as shown in the illustration below. This is important because otherwise the horizon will be too 'thin' and it means that you have to zoom out too much for the scenery to be properly sized.
stellarium2

Saturday, August 9, 2014

Stellarium Landscapes: South America, Polar regions and Special.

Creating a Personalised Landscape for Stellarium.

Digital cameras are easy and cheaply available these days so whatever you have should do.

One mega-pixel resolution is quite sufficient.

The camera needs to be mounted on a tripod so that reasonably orientated pictures can be taken.

Select a time of day that is quite bright with a neutral cloudy sky so there will be no shadows and a sky of the same overall texture.

This will make it easier to remove later.

The pictures were all saved in the JPG format which was used as the common format for all processes up to the removal of the background.

With a camera that takes 4:3 ratio pictures I found 14 evenly spaced pictures gave the best 360° panorama in the program I used to produce it.

stellarium largeImg

Stellarium Landscapes: North America.

dAfter my first successful try today, I thought I'd write a little tutorial for creating landscapes. Here are some (hopefully) simple steps:

5. Write your landscape file. This can be done by copying and editing the following text into your 'landscape.ini' file:
[landscape]
name = Enter your landscape name here
author = Enter your name here
description = Enter a description here
type = spherical
maptex = yourimagename.png
angle_rotatez = Enter angle
[location]
planet = Enter planet
latitude = +XXdXX'XX"
longitude = -XXdXX'XX"W
altitude = X
name: This is the name of your landscape as it will appear in the program.
author: Your name
description: A brief description of the landscape.
type: The style of image. Leave as spherical.
maptex: The filename of your panorama (in the same folder as the .ini file).
angle_rotatez: Experiment with this to get your compass points in the right location. It is a three figure bearing (i.e. - 010, 254, etc...)
planet: The name of the planet your landscape is on.
latitude/longitude: The location of your landscape on your planet. Does not need to be accurate - it is for reference purposes only. It will not affect what you see in the sky.
altitude: The altitude (M) of your spot. Once again, purely for reference.

stellarium 26_large

Stellarium Landscapes: Europe.

edAfter my first successful try today, I thought I'd write a little tutorial for creating landscapes. Here are some (hopefully) simple steps:

3. Delete the sky from the image. Stellarium looks for 'blank' locations in the image when it decides where the scenery ends and the sky begins, so you need to erase the actual sky from the photo. I used paint.net to select the sky in my panorama, and then pressed 'delete' to get rid of it, exposing the checkered canvas behind. You cannot just paint over it in MS Paint, you actually need to remove it from the canvas. To add extra effect, you can delete the pixels in subtle areas (between tree branches, through windows, etc...) to produce a realistic horizon.


4. Create your landscape folder. You need to add a new folder to the Program Files --- Stellarium --- landscapes directory (its name does not matter). Then, create a next file called 'landscape.ini' (you can copy and paste this from another landscape folder and erase its contents) and copy your panorama to the same folder.

stellarium2

Stellarium Landscapes: Asia and Australasia.

After my first successful try today, I thought I'd write a little tutorial for creating landscapes. Here are some (hopefully) simple steps:


1. Take your images. All I did was take my compact camera and my tripod out to my desired location, and take a set of horizon shots (all the way round) and then import them to Autostitch to make a simple panorama (see below). I filled the ground in by copying and pasting, as you can see (the original panorama was not straight, so it left some black areas underneath). The Panorama must be a PNG, and I recommend sizing it down to about 2048 pixels in width. The following panorama has already been processed for Stellarium (see step 3) which is why the sky is missing. Once you have your panorama, move on to step 2.

2. Extend the canvas. This involves increasing the height of the image above and below the horizon, as shown in the illustration below. This is important because otherwise the horizon will be too 'thin' and it means that you have to zoom out too much for the scenery to be properly sized. You can see it as putting more floor between you and the horizon scenery, meaning that it appears further away from you. The actual horizon on Stellarium runs through the centre of the image, so you need to keep your image horizon in the middle of the picture when you are adding the extensions.

 

stellarium fish

Stellarium Landscapes: Africa.

How to install landscapes After you have downloaded the .zip file for a landscape from this page, you need to install it in Stellarium.

Manual.

If you are using an earlier version of Stellarium, you can follow this procedure to install a landscape package:

  1. Browse to your User Data Directory, which varies according to your operating system. (eg. in Windows Vista/7 enter  %appdata%\stellarium in Explorer's location bar )
  2. Create a sub-directory called landscapes in your user directory (if it doesn't exist).
  3. Unzip the landscape .zip file in the landscapes directory (if it's done right, a sub-directory should be created for each landscape).

NOTE: Older version of Stellarium (prior to v0.9.0) used a slightly different mechanism for doing landscapes. You can find a list of the old landscapes here.

stellarium add-remove-landscapes-window

Stellarium Landscapes: Interplanetary.

How to install landscapes

After you have downloaded the .zip file for a landscape from this page, you need to install it in Stellarium.

Automatic.

If you have Stellarium 0.10.6 or later version, you can use the "Add/remove landscapes" feature to install landscapes automatically:

  • Open the "Sky and viewing options" window by clicking on the appropriate button in the left button bar (or press the F4 key).
  • The "Add/remove landscapes" button is at the bottom of the "Landscape" tab.
  • When you press it, the "Add/remove landscapes" window will appear. It allows you to install .zip files containing landscapes. It also lists the user-installed landscapes and allows you to remove them.

Note: that while this makes installing landscapes easier, it may also cause you to overlook what else is included in the ZIP archive. Landscape packages created without this feature in mind may contain other files, such as alternative textures in different sizes.

stellarium add-remove-landscapes-button

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